Posted by & filed under Chapter 13 - Future Issues, Chapter 8 - The Collective Bargaining Process, Chapter 9 - Strikes and Lockouts.

Description: Federal Labour Minister Lisa Raitt has announced she will introduce legislation to end the Canada Post lockout.

Source: Canadian Business

Date: 06/20/2011

Link: http://www.canadianbusiness.com/article/30532–ottawa-tables-bill-ordering-locked-out-postal-workers-back-to-work

Related links:

Questions for discussion:

  • What arguments can you think of in favour of introducing back-to-work legislation in this dispute?
  • What arguments can you think of against introducing back-to-work legislation in this dispute?
  • What effect do you think this move will have on long-term labour relations at Canada Post?
  • How is this dispute similar to the Air Canada dispute?
  • How does it differ?

Posted by & filed under Chapter 13 - Future Issues, Chapter 3 - HIstory of the Canadian Union Movement, Chapter 8 - The Collective Bargaining Process, Chapter 9 - Strikes and Lockouts.

Description: Striking Air Canada workers will be voting on a new contract after the federal government introduced back-to-work legislation in the Commons.

Source: The Windsor Star

Date: 06/20/2011

Link: http://www.windsorstar.com/business/leaders+Canada+deal/4973375/story.html

Related links:

Questions for discussion:

  • What can you say about the timing of this strike?
  • Why do you think the government introduced back-to-work legislation in this dispute more quickly than in the Canada Post dispute?
  • What do you think would have happened if the government had not introduced back-to-work legislation?
  • What effect do you think the back-to-work legislation will have on long-term labour relations at Air Canada?
  • What happens if the workers do not ratify the contract?

Posted by & filed under Operations Management.

Canadian company Transformix knows the secret to making manufacturing work – add value and have a good neighbor. Everything else will take care of itself. So when the tsunami hit Japan, Transformix CEO Peng-Sang Cau did not worry about the impact. She bought more supplies. Ms. Cau does not worry about from where her parts come. She is too busy guiding the company in what it does best, which is utilizing intellectual capital to design high speed manufacturing equipment prized by other companies, particularly those in the United States.

QUESTIONS:

  1. We typically think of productivity as an internal element that creates a competitive advantage. For Transformix, it is something different. What is it?
  2. What is Transformix’ competitive advantage as a middle player in the supply chain?
  3. Discuss how Transformix blends manufacturing and service technology to add value.
  4. Use Figure 18.2 to analyze Ms. Cau’s decision making following the March 11 disaster in Japan.

SOURCE: R. Blackwell, “Canadian Manufacturers Find a Niche Supplying the Intellectual Part,” Globe and Mail (Retrievable online at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/economy/manufacturing/canadian-manufacturers-find-a-niche-supplying-the-intellectual-part/article2060920/singlepage/#articlecontent)

Related video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4e8u6xJLTzE

Posted by & filed under Chapter 3 - HIstory of the Canadian Union Movement, Chapter 8 - The Collective Bargaining Process, Chapter 9 - Strikes and Lockouts.

Description: Air Canada sales and customer-service  employees, represented by the Canadian Auto Workers Union, are threatening to strike over wages and pensions.

Source: CBC

Date: 06/13/2011

Link: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2011/06/13/aircanada-striketalks-monday.html

Related links:

Questions for discussion:

  • Browse the links above. As you will see, one of the key issues in this dispute is pensions. What is a defined benefit pension?
  • What is a defined contribution pension?
  • Which type of pension would you prefer if you were an employee?
  • Which would you prefer if you were an employer?
  • Why?

Posted by & filed under Chapter 13 - Future Issues, Chapter 8 - The Collective Bargaining Process, Chapter 9 - Strikes and Lockouts.

Description: Canada Post is cutting mail deliveries, saying rotating strikes are costing it millions; the Canadian Union of Postal Workers counters that the company is trying to spark a full strike.

Source: CBC

Date: 06/13/2011

Link: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2011/06/13/postal-strike-13.html

Related links:

Questions for discussion:

  • Union president Denis Lemelin says Canada Post is trying to impose a “partial lockout.” What does he mean?
  • Do you think the term is accurate?
  • Lemelin says the company is trying to provoke a general strike. Do you think a general strike, as opposed to rotating strikes, would be in Canada Post’s interest?
  • Why or why not?
  • The union says Canada Post wants the federal government to impose back-to-work legislation. Why do you think the employer would want back-to-work legislation?
  • How do you think the union would feel about back-to-work legislation?
  • Why?

Posted by & filed under Chapter 13 - Future Issues, Chapter 8 - The Collective Bargaining Process, Chapter 9 - Strikes and Lockouts.

Description: Members of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers began rotating strikes following the expiration of 72-hour strike notice.

Source: CTV.ca

Date: 06/03/2011

Link: http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20110602/wpg_postal_strike_110602/20110603/?hub=WinnipegHome

Related links:

Question for discussion:

  • What is the difference between a rotating strike and a normal strike?
  • Why would a union choose to hold rotating strikes rather than an all-out strike?
  • List some of the considerations that would go into a decision to hold a rotating strike.
  • Read the letter to the editor and the opinion piece above. Which arguments do you find the most persuasive?
  • Are there significant points that the two writers don’t address?

Posted by & filed under Chapter 1 - Introduction, Chapter 10 - Third-Party Intervention, Chapter 13 - Future Issues, Chapter 8 - The Collective Bargaining Process.

Description: An arbitrator has granted members of the Ontario Nurses’ Association lump-sum bonuses, despite a provincial government wage freeze policy.

Source: The Toronto Star

Date: 06/03/2011

Link: http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/article/1002549–nurses-get-bonuses-despite-wage-freeze

Related links:

Questions for discussion:

  • Review the links above. How does this settlement fit within the government wage freeze?
  • How does this settlement work out to a “net zero increase?”
  • If you belonged to this union, would you prefer a lump-sum award or a wage increase? Why?
  • What is the role of the provincial government in collective bargaining with the nurses’ union?
  • What is the role of the Ontario Hospital Association?

Posted by & filed under Communication.

The annual World Wide Developer Conference is a much anticipated event because it has been the venue of choice for Steve Jobs to announce new offerings by Apple. However, this year’s event has been preceded by carefully timed “leaks” of information indicating that the new announcement by Jobs will relate to the launch of iCloud, a service providing remote access to media. The service will replace the dismal MobileMe.

QUESTIONS:

  1. Does Apple need/have social capital? If so, with whom? How might the timing and location of product/service announcements influence social capital?
  2. From the standpoint of effective and efficient communication, discuss why Apple historically prefers to announce the launch of new products and services at the World Wide Developer Conference. Do you have any idea why Apple chose to make a pre-announcement?
  3. Steve Jobs will temporarily suspend his medical leave of absence to attend WWDC and make Apple’s product/service announcement. Why (i.e., why is it important for Mr. Jobs to make these announcements)?
  4. Discuss how beta testing, pre-announcements, and announcements to developers are consistent with the notion of feedback.

SOURCE: J. Berkow, “Launch of iCloud Seen as a Major Shift for Apple,” National Post (Retrievable online at http://business.financialpost.com/2011/06/06/launch-of-icloud-seen-as-a-major-shift-for-apple/)

Posted by & filed under Teams.

The Vancouver Canucks, leading the Stanley Cup Finals 2-0 over the Boston Bruins, seem to have luck on their side. While the Bruins may come back and win the championship, things definitely seem to be going the Canucks’ way. Few knowledgeable people believe that the success of the Vancouver franchise hinges on luck. Other factors definitely play a role.

QUESTIONS:

  1. Review the many different ways in which Vancouver has been winning and then discuss this in light of teamwork. We often use the term “team” rather loosely. What makes the Canucks a team?
  2. Rather than write off the Canucks previous failures as “bad luck” or the current successes as “good bounces,” examine what is taking place from the standpoint of how teams work. Focus on the inputs and throughputs that produce desired outputs in this case. How do the inputs for the current team different from the past? As you read the final few sentences of the article, what does this example suggest about the way players interact and work together? Why is this important?
  3. While task and maintenance roles seem to apply to team meetings, discuss how the Canucks are able to accomplish several of these activities in order to be successful.

SOURCE: R. MacGregor, “Laughter in Vancouver as Bounces Go All Their Way,” Globe and Mail (Retrievable online at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/roy-macgregor/laughter-in-vancouver-as-bounces-go-all-their-way/article2048073/)

Related video at: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/video/video-burrows-scores-overtime-winner/article2047967/

Posted by & filed under Change.

The world-wide recession was driven in large part by numerous failures in two key industries – banking and automotive. In the United States, many of the big players in both industries required substantial bailouts from the Government to survive. On the financial side, J.P. Morgan Chase was considered one of the more stable banks, as its top management team managed to stay intact and avoid much of the scrutiny other companies endured. However, as the global economy remains stifled, Morgan is looking very closely at its management team and making changes that it believes will usher in a new era.

QUESTIONS:

  1. What model of change leadership is J.P. Morgan Chase utilizing? What are its reasons for doing so?
  2. Do you believe the changes likely to occur will be incremental or transformational? Why? Since J.P. Morgan seems to be doing well, what are the drivers of these changes?
  3. What are the likely targets of these changes (i.e., what aspects of the company will the changes influence)?
  4. Assume that J.P. Morgan is attempting to implement broad (organization-wide) change. What is the best change strategy to utilize? What is your rationale?
  5. While we do not know the reasons for Heidi Miller’s pending retirement and Todd Maclin’s job shift, would moving top management out/to other positions be an effective way to deal with resistance change? Why or why not?

SOURCE: D. Fitzpatrick, R. Sidel, & D. Enrich, “Talk of Changes at Stable J.P. Morgan,” Wall Street Journal (Retrievable online at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304906004576367570268643228.html)